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LETTER TO EDITOR
Year : 2013  |  Volume : 40  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 189-190

Comparison of healing activity of jethimadh with triphala on experimentally induced thermal burn wound in rats


1 Department of Pharmacology, Hitech Medical College, Bhubaneswar, Odisha, India
2 Department of Pharmacology, Dr. Dnyandeo Yashwantrao Patil Medical College, Pune, Maharashtra, India
3 Department of Pharmacology, Nilratan Sircar Medical College, Kolkata, West Bengal, India
4 Department of Ophthalmology, Ruxmaniben Deepchand Gardi Medical College, Ujjain, Madhya Pradesh, India

Date of Web Publication19-Oct-2013

Correspondence Address:
Arijit Ghosh
Department of Pharmacology, Nilratan Sircar Medical College, Kolkata, West Bengal
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0974-5009.120038

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How to cite this article:
Pandey M, Worlikar PS, Ghosh A, Bondekar AA, Chetan S. Comparison of healing activity of jethimadh with triphala on experimentally induced thermal burn wound in rats. J Sci Soc 2013;40:189-90

How to cite this URL:
Pandey M, Worlikar PS, Ghosh A, Bondekar AA, Chetan S. Comparison of healing activity of jethimadh with triphala on experimentally induced thermal burn wound in rats. J Sci Soc [serial online] 2013 [cited 2019 Aug 23];40:189-90. Available from: http://www.jscisociety.com/text.asp?2013/40/3/189/120038

Sir,

Burn can be defined as tissue damage caused by a variety of agents such as heat, chemicals, electricity, sunlight, or nuclear radiation. [1] Management of burn wounds is important because they are painful and can result in permanent disfiguring and disabling scarring. Most of the early treatment modalities include topical application of medicament, mainly aimed at preventing infection. Various topical agents such as calcium mupirocin, silver sulfadiazine, silver sulfadiazine, and so on are used in patients with burn wound. [1],[2] Recently, the traditional use of plants for wound healing has received attention by the scientific community. Two such agents, triphala (dried fruits of Terminalia chebula, Terminalia bellirica, and Phyllanthus emblica) and jethimadh (Glycyrrhizae glabra Linn) have been found to promote healing of wound in rats. The study conducted by Pandey et al., [3] suggest that healing activity of jethimadh with respect to triphala is significantly higher on rat model of incised wound and is comparable on rat model of excised wound. Against this background, the present study was planned to compare the healing activity of jethimadh with triphala on experimentally induced thermal burn wound in rats.

Triphala powder and silver sulfadiazine were purchased from IMPCOPS Ltd, Chennai, and Croslands Ltd, India, respectively. Jethimadh powder was purchased from Taj Agro International, Mumbai, India. A 10% (w/w) jethimadh ointment was prepared by mixing 5 g jethimadh powder with 50 g cow's ghee. A 10% (w/w) triphala ointment was prepared by mixing 5 g of triphala extract in 50 g of sesame oil (S. D. Fine-Chem. Ltd., India).

Experimentally naive male Sprague-Dawley albino rats weighing between 150 and 200 g were used. The rats were maintained under standard conditions of temperature (25°C ± 5°C), relative humidity (55% ± 10%) and a 12/12 h light/dark cycle. The rats were fed with commercial rat pellet diet manufactured by Pranav Agro Food, Pune, Maharashtra, India and water ad libitum. The rats were procured from institutional animal house (Registration no-619/02/a/CPCSEA) and the study was approved by the Institutional Animal Ethics Committee.

Partial thickness burn wounds were inflicted in overnight fasted rats under ketamine (50 mg/kg/i.p.) anesthesia by pouring hot molten wax at 80°C into a metal cylinder of 300 mm 2 circular opening placed on shaven back of the rat. [1] Thereafter, rats were divided into five groups. Group I (n = 6)-Sesame oil group, served as control for triphala group. Group II (n = 6)-Cow's ghee group served as control for jethimadh group. Group III (n = 6)-Silver sulfadiazine group, served as positive control. Group IV (n = 6)-Triphala group, the comparator group. Group V (n = 6)-Jethimadh group, the study group. The formulations were applied topically with a sterile cotton swab in rats of each group once daily. Evaluation was done by measuring wound contraction. Wound surface was traced on a transparent sheet on day 3, 6, 9, 12, and on alternate days till complete epithelialization. The wound contraction was calculated by the following formula. [3]

% Closure = (1- AD / AO ) × 100 (A0-wound area on day 0, AD-wound area on corresponding day).

Contraction of wound was expressed as percentage of wound closure. Data were analyzed by analysis of variance followed by Turkey's honestly significant different test. The criterion for statistical significance was defined as P < 0.05.

Complete wound closure was observed in jethimadh ointment treated group on day 18. So, the percentages of wound closure in different groups on day 18 were compared and have been shown in [Figure 1]. Mean percentage of wound closure in group IV (93.1% ± 2.9%) was significantly higher compared to group I (86.1% ± 5.2%) and also in group V (100% ± 0%) compared to group II (86.4% ± 4.1%). Mean percentage wound closure in group V was significantly higher compared to group III (94.8 ± 3.6) and group IV.
Figure 1: Percentage of wound closure in different groups after 18 days

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Chemical, thermal, or radiation burns to the skin or other tissues produce a remarkably different healing response due to their effects on the viability of cells and tissue. Thermal burns in particular create an extensive zone of frank necrosis that includes dead cells and denatured or even charred connective tissue. Beyond the area of total destruction, a zone of coagulation necrosis exists, in which denaturation of plasma and cellular protein leads to the obstruction of blood vessels and lymphatics. This effect in turn induces nutrient starvation of the involved tissue. [4] Scalding model is one of the most common methods for experimental burn models. The possibility of varying water temperature, time of exposure, and the burned area makes this model ideal for reproducing almost every kind of thermal wound. This model can also be modified by using hot molten wax for producing burns instead of water as done by Bairy et al. [1]

Our study revealed that formulation of jethimadh in cow ghee and triphala in sesame oil has shown great promise in promoting healing. The above data suggest healing activity of jethimadh with respect to triphala and silver sulfadiazine is significantly higher on experimentally induced burn wound in rats. The data also suggest healing activity was comparable in both triphala- and silver sulfadiazine-treated groups. This knowledge will further enable us to carry out extensive clinical trials of these formulations on human volunteers so as to provide better medications for healing of burn wounds in future.


  Acknowledgment Top


Department of Pharmaclogy, 1 Dr. Dnyandeo Yashwantrao Patil Medical College, Pune

 
  References Top

1.Bairy KL, Pawan Kumar AV, Holla AM, Chandra Shekar BR, Bhavya LB, Satish Kumar MC. Comparative effect of calcium mupirocin and fluticasone on experimentally induced burn wound healing in rats. Int J Appl Biol Pharm Technol 2011;2:140-3.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.Ahuja RB, Gupta A, Gur R. A prospective double-blinded comparative analysis of silver sulfadiazine and silver sulphadiazine as topical agents for burns: A pilot study. Burns 2009;35:672-6.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.Pandey M, Worlikar PS, Ghosh A, Bondekar AA, Chetan S. Comparison of wound healing activity of Jethimadh with Triphala in rats. Int J Health Allied Sci 2012;1:59-63.  Back to cited text no. 3
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4.Rozaini MZ, Noordin M, Hakim NA. The effects of different types of honey on tensile strength evaluation of burn wound tissue healing. Int J Appl Res Vet Med 2004;2:290-5.  Back to cited text no. 4
    


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