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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2018  |  Volume : 45  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 72-75

Anogenital distance in males attending assisted reproduction center


1 Department of Urology, JN Medical College, KLE Academy of Higher Education and Research (Deemed-to-be-University), JNMC Campus; Department of Urology, KLES Kidney Foundation, KLES Dr. Prabhakar Kore Hospital and Medical Research Centre, Belagavi, Karnataka, India
2 Department of Urology, KLES Kidney Foundation, KLES Dr. Prabhakar Kore Hospital and Medical Research Centre, Belagavi, Karnataka, India
3 Department of Biotechnology and Microbiology, Karnatak University, Dharwad, Karnataka, India
4 Department of Biochemistry, Kuvempu University, Shankarghatta, Shivamogga, Karnataka, India

Correspondence Address:
R B Nerli
Department of Urology, JN Medical College, KLE Academy of Higher Education and Research (Deemed-to-be-University), JNMC Campus, Belagavi - 590 010, Karnataka
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jss.JSS_34_18

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Introduction: Anogenital distance (AGD) is a marker for endocrine disruption in animal studies in which decreased distance has been associated with testicular dysfunction. Measurement of AGD has also been used as a marker for genital development. Recently, it has been used to correlate with sperm production. In this study, we have investigated the relationship between AGD, sperm parameters, testicular size, and total testosterone levels in men attending assisted reproduction center (ARC). Materials and Methods: All the male partners of infertile couples presenting to the ARC were prospectively included in the study. Semen analysis, serum and blood biochemistry tests, and hormone assessment were done in all patients. The AGD measurements were done with the patient lying in supine position, and the distance from the posterior aspect of the scrotum to the anal verge was measured using a digital caliper. Results: The mean AGD was 3.19 ± 0.18 cm in patients with azoospermia, 3.40 ± 0.28 in oligospermia, 3.38 ± 0.24 in oligoasthenospermia, 3.30 ± 0.21 in oligoasthenoteratospermia, and 4.21 ± 0.23 in patients with normal sperm parameters. The testicular volume was significantly lower in patients with abnormal sperm parameters when compared to patients with normal sperm parameters. The total testosterone levels were significantly lower in patients with abnormal sperm parameters when compared to patients with normal sperm parameters. Conclusions: AGD may provide a novel metric to assess testicular function in men. A longer AGD is associated with fatherhood and may predict normal male reproductive potential.


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