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LETTER TO EDITOR
Year : 2019  |  Volume : 46  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 114

Minimizing the number of newborn deaths in vulnerable sections of the community


1 Vice-Principal Curriculum, Member of the Medical Education Unit and Institute Research Council, Department of Community Medicine, Shri Sathya Sai Medical College and Research Institute, Sri Balaji Vidyapeeth – Deemed to be University, Ammapettai, Nellikuppam, Chengalpattu, Kancheepuram, Tamil Nadu, India
2 Department of Community Medicine, Shri Sathya Sai Medical College and Research Institute, Sri Balaji Vidyapeeth – Deemed to be University, Ammapettai, Nellikuppam, Chengalpattu, Kancheepuram, Tamil Nadu, India

Date of Web Publication28-Jan-2020

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Saurabh RamBihariLal Shrivastava
Department of Community Medicine, Shri Sathya Sai Medical College and Research Institute, Sri Balaji Vidyapeeth . Deemed to be University, Tiruporur-Guduvancherry Main Road, Ammapettai, Nellikuppam, Chengalpet, Kancheepuram - 603 108, Tamil Nadu
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jss.JSS_30_19

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How to cite this article:
Shrivastava SR, Shrivastava PS. Minimizing the number of newborn deaths in vulnerable sections of the community. J Sci Soc 2019;46:114

How to cite this URL:
Shrivastava SR, Shrivastava PS. Minimizing the number of newborn deaths in vulnerable sections of the community. J Sci Soc [serial online] 2019 [cited 2020 Feb 28];46:114. Available from: http://www.jscisociety.com/text.asp?2019/46/3/114/276996



Sir,

Significant progress has been reported since the adoption of the Millennium Development Goals, especially in reducing the number of deaths of underfive children, especially newborns.[1] Nevertheless, in the year 2017 alone, in excess of 2.5 million children lost their lives within the 1st month of their lives, of which almost 2 million died in the 1st week after birth.[1] As a matter of fact, the risk of a child's death is maximum in the neonatal period, and thus, there is an immense need to take collective actions involving support from all the concerned sectors, including the environment.[1],[2] Furthermore, in the global mission to accomplish universal health coverage, the urgent need of the hour is to direct the measures toward the susceptible segments of the society.[1],[3]

It is noteworthy that the decline in the overall neonatal mortality (50%) between the periods of 1990 and 2017 has been quite lesser than that of the number of deaths reported in postneonatal under-five mortality (62%).[1] This is a direct indication that we have to focus our attention toward strengthening of the quality of services during pregnancy, childbirth, and in the postpartum period.[1] However, we should also focus toward the existing deficiencies, including the high incidence of home deliveries, poor infrastructure, inadequate financial support, substandard quality of health-care services, and shortage in the number of trained health-care professionals.[1],[3]

It has been anticipated that in the absence of urgent measures, more than 60 nations would not meet the proposed target of bringing about an end to all newborn deaths which can be averted by the year 2030.[4] As we have succeeded in saving the lives of millions of under-five children, it clearly reflects that the health sector has made considerable gains in the field of saving lives of newborns.[2],[4] This is the result of the implementation of cost-effective measures, nevertheless, the attained gain can be further magnified by reducing the inequitable distribution of resources among different sections of people.[1],[4] Further, strategies such as improving access to trained health-care professionals, better financial support, involvement of the community, and better access to water and sanitation services can play an important role in further reducing the number of newborn deaths.[2],[3],[4]

In conclusion, there is an immense need to shift our focus toward the vulnerable population groups and improve the newborn survival rate in the coming years.



 
  References Top

1.
World Health Organization. Newborns: Reducing Mortality – Fact Sheet. World Health Organization; 2018. Available from: http://www.who.int/en/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/newborns-reducing-mortality. [Last accessed on 2019 Jun 11].  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Shrivastava SR, Shrivastava PS, Ramasamy J. The role of environment in determining children's health. Cukurova Med J 2018;43:507-8.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
World Health Organization. 7000 Newborns Die Every Day, Despite Steady Decrease in Under-Five Mortality, New Report Says. World Health Organization; 2017. Available from: . [Last accessed on 2019 Jun 11].  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
Shrivastava SR, Shrivastava PS, Ramasamy J. Saving lives of mothers and newborns from infections around the time of childbirth by strengthening health sector response to the public health concern of antibiotic resistance. Ann Trop Med Public Health 2017;10:1405-6.  Back to cited text no. 4
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