Journal of the Scientific Society

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2018  |  Volume : 45  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 63--66

Supine percutaneous nephrolithotomy in children


Rajendra B Nerli1, Amit Mungarwadi2, Shridhar C Ghagane4, Neeraj S Dixit4, Murigendra B Hiremath3 
1 Department of Urology, JN Medical College, KLE Academy of Higher Education and Research (Deemed-to-be-University); Department of Urology, KLES Kidney Foundation, KLES Dr. Prabhakar Kore Hospital and M. R. C, Belagavi, Karnataka, India
2 Department of Urology, JN Medical College, KLE Academy of Higher Education and Research (Deemed-to-be-University), Belagavi, Karnataka, India
3 Department of Biotechnology and Microbiology, Karnatak University, Dharwad, Karnataka, India

Correspondence Address:
Rajendra B Nerli
Department of Urology, KLES Kidney Foundation, KLES Dr. Prabhakar Kore Hospital and M. R. C, Nehru Nagar, Belagavi - 590 010, Karnataka
India

Introduction: The stone disease in children shows wide geographic variations, and its incidence has increased worldwide in children of all ages. Percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) has gradually emerged as one of the standard treatment options for the management of renal stones >1.5 cm in pediatric cases. PCNL just like in adults has been performed in the prone position. Of late observing the successful use of supine position for PCNL in adults, pediatric urologists have been encouraged to use the supine access for PCNL in children. We report our early experience with supine PCNL in children. Materials and Methods: All children with symptomatic renal stones presenting to the pediatric urological services of our hospital were prospectively included into the study to undergo supine PCNL. Children with skeletal anomalies, bleeding diathesis, and active urinary tract infection were excluded from the study. Results: Ten children (six males and four females) with a mean age of 11.48 ± 2.08 years (9–18 years) underwent supine PCNL. The mean size of the stone was 22 mm (range 17–47 mm). The initial stone-free rate was 90% immediately after a single PCNL session. One child needed an additional extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy session to clear a 7-mm fragment. The average operative time (from the beginning of the puncture trial to nephrostomy tube insertion) was 70 ± 5 min. Conclusions: Supine PCNL in children is feasible, safe, and an effective means for management of renal stones in the pediatric population.


How to cite this article:
Nerli RB, Mungarwadi A, Ghagane SC, Dixit NS, Hiremath MB. Supine percutaneous nephrolithotomy in children.J Sci Soc 2018;45:63-66


How to cite this URL:
Nerli RB, Mungarwadi A, Ghagane SC, Dixit NS, Hiremath MB. Supine percutaneous nephrolithotomy in children. J Sci Soc [serial online] 2018 [cited 2019 May 27 ];45:63-66
Available from: http://www.jscisociety.com/article.asp?issn=0974-5009;year=2018;volume=45;issue=2;spage=63;epage=66;aulast=Nerli;type=0